1971 Hot Wheels Ontario Trio – Oval

Ontario Motor Speedway ran the inaugural, open wheel California 500 race on September 6, 1970.

Cal500 poster

A huge crowd of 180,000 saw Jim McElrearth take home the victory with the #14 Coyote.

Jim McElreath and his #14 car in the winner circle at Ontario Motor Speedway.

Jim McElreath and his #14 car in the winner circle at Ontario Motor Speedway.

The 1971 Hot Wheels Ontario Trio set pays homage to this track.  The oval layout consists of 32 feet of orange track, 8 joiners, 1 dual-lane Rod Runner with fair start T-bar, two 180 degree dual-lane curves and 2 crossovers.

OT1

Today’s race features a purple 2011 Indy car against a teal F1 Racer.

left to right: 2011 Indy Car vs teal F1 Racer.

left to right: 2011 Indy Car vs teal F1 Racer.

Here’s a lap around the oval.

At the start.

At the start.

The Rod Runner launch.

The Rod Runner launch.

Flying into the first crossover.

Flying into the first crossover.

Screaming out of the first crossover.

Screaming out of the first crossover.

Hard tilt into the first dual-lane curve.

Hard tilt into the first dual-lane curve.

Down the back stretch.

Down the back stretch.

Into the second crossover.

Into the second crossover.

Out of the second crossover.

Out of the second crossover.

Racing into the second dual-lane curve.

Racing into the second dual-lane curve.

Blasting out of the second dual-lane curve.

Blasting out of the second dual-lane curve.

Heading back to the dual-lane Rod Runner.

Heading back to the dual-lane Rod Runner.

Here’s how the 30 lap race turned out.

 

So there you have it. The 1971 Hot Wheels Ontario Trio oval layout.

It’s still fast. Still fun.

Box art - side. The Oval.

Box art – side. The Oval.

Box art - back. Oval layout.

Box art – back. Oval layout.

Box art - side.

Box art – side.

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1970 Hot Wheels Dual-Lane Rod Runner Race Set: Oval Layout

NASCAR defines the race tracks they use as: road courses (a circuit with left and right hand turns), short tracks ( less than 1 mile, all left hand turns), intermediate tracks (between 1 and 2 miles, all left hand turns) and superspeedways (2 miles or longer, all left hand turns).

There are 6 superspeedways: Daytona Beach, Fontana, Indianapolis, Michigan, Pocono and Talladega.

The 1970 Dual-Lane Rod Runner Race Set can be set up as an oval.  Originally the set supplies 32 feet of orange track.  But, I am going to add 16 more feet (for a total of 48 feet) to produce my own version of a superspeedway.  I’ll also use 20 joiners, 2 – 180 degree dual-lane curves, 2 white trestles 1 dual-lane rod runner and 1 “fair start” T-bar.

Oval layout instructions look like this:

How to assemble 180 degree dual-lane curves. Copyright Mattel, Inc.

The Dual-Lane Rod Runner Race Set’s basic oval layout. Copyright Mattel, Inc.

Here’s the oval layout extended to superspeedway size.

In keeping with the NASCAR theme, I am going to race two 2010 Chevrolet Impala stock cars with Faster Than Ever wheels.

Time for a superspeedway lap.
Ready at the start.

“Boogity, Boogity, Boogity!  Let’s go racing boys!”1

Flying down the front straightaway.

Hitting the high banking of the first 180 degree dual-lane curve.

Thundering down the back stretch.

Into the second curve.

And back to the Rod Runner.

Here’s my YouTube video of a 60 lap superspeedway oval race – NASCAR style.

So there you have it.  The 1970 Hot Wheels Dual-Lane Rod Runner Race Set: Oval Layout.

It’s still fast.  Still fun.

A nice example of a complete Dual-Lane Rod Runner Race Set. Courtesy eBay.

A Custom Eldorado and a Custom Corvette included. Courtesy eBay.

Dual-Lane Rod Runner box art- front.

Dual-Lane Rod Runner box art – back.

Dual-Lane Rod Runner box art – end.

Dual-Lane Curve Pak. Courtesy eBay.

Dual-Lane Curve Pak box art – back. Courtesy eBay.

Footnote 1. Opening salvo by TV commentator Darrell Waltrip at the thrilling start of all Nascar races.  Apparently the catchphrase arose when Waltrip, as a race car driver, grew tired of hearing “Green, Green, Green” from his spotter or crew chief at the beginning of each race and wanted to hear something different.