1970 Hot Wheels Hi-Performance Set

There aren’t a lot of these sets around. I never saw one as a kid. They don’t show up on eBay very often. And until a few years ago, as an adult, I didn’t even know what made up a Hi-Performance Set.

Today, we’re going to fix all that by putting together and running a complete Hi-Performance Set.

Here are the components.

Here’s the layout.

I’ll use a 2005 Ford Mustang to go through the set.

On the second floor of the Tune-Up Tower.

Taking the elevator to the top floor.

Backing out on the third floor.

Checking wheels speed and drift on the Dyno-Meter treadmill.

On the ramp, ready to go.

Lifting the ramp to launch the car.

Heading for the track below.

Taking the first curve.

On the floor and running toward the main track.

Into the bottom of the 2-way Super-Charger.

Blasting out of the Super-Charger.

Charging through the elevated section of the Figure-8 track.

Crossing the bridge and going back to the Super-Charger.

Powering out of the 2-way Super-Charger again.

Speeding past the bottom floor of the Tune-Up Tower.

Running strong, lap after lap.

Here’s my YouTube video of this track in action. I feature 4 redlines from 1969 that represent Mattel’s first in-house-designed fantasy cars.

So there you have it. The 1970 Hot Wheels Hi-Performance Set.

Making Hot Wheels still fast.  Still fun.

1970 Hot Wheels Hi-Performance Set: Introduction

The Tune-Up Tower was packaged three ways in 1970:

in it’s own box,

Tune-Up Tower box art – front. Courtesy eBay

with the Road Trials Set

Box art – front.

and, most prominently, as part of the Hi-Performance Set.

Mattel described this set as a “giant freeway system”. The idea was give your car a tune up, then head out on the busy roadway. And for traffic, 4 new cars came with it. That was more cars than any other set Mattel offered in 1970.

A Custom Corvette and a Custom Volkswagen on the left side. Courtesy eBay.

A Torero and a Lola GT70 on the right side. Courtesy eBay.

Here’s an example of the rest of the contents that came in a Hi-Performance Set.

The Super-Charger and track. Courtesy eBay.

Track and Tune-Up Tower pieces. Courtesy eBay.

Collectors’ catalogue and stickers. Courtesy eBay.

Here’s what the Hi-Performance Set does.

Measure wheel speed and drift.

Adjust axles with the Tune-Up wrench.

Move cars between floors with the elevator.

Use the 2-Way Super Charger to power your cars.

Like all images from the redline era, the box art on this set is amazing.

Box art – side (color)

Box art – side (red, black & white)

Based on the 1968 Alfa Romeo Carabo Concept car, here is Mattel’s 1970 released Carabo being launched out of the Super-Charger.

 

Maserati Mistral on the treadmill, Mercedes Benz 280 SL parked by the 2 hoists, Heavyweight Tow Truck on the launch ramp, Custom Continental Mark III on the elevator and the Custom Police Cruiser heading down to the track.

 

Custom AMX waiting for the elevator to come down and a blue Custom Nomad roaring past the Tune-Up Tower.

Box art – back

Close up of contents list.

Close up of 2-way Super-Charger.

Close up of Tune-Up Tower.

Box art – end.

So there you have it. An introduction for the 1970 Hot Wheels Hi-Performance Set.

Making Hot Wheels still fast. Still fun.

1970 Collectors’ Catalogue image of the Hi-Performance Set.

1969 Hot Wheels Super-Charger Grand Prix Race Set (part 2)

This is Hot Wheels’s biggest track set for 1969, the Super-Charger Grand Prix Race Set.

Box art - front with included cars visible. Courtesy eBay.

Box art – front with included cars visible. Courtesy eBay.

There are a lot of track pieces.

IMG_2853

The layout is huge.

IMG_2765

Here’s the fully assembled race track.

IMG_2460

Time for some perspective. It’s 1969 and we are about to embark on “lap after lap” action. Just the year before, we experienced ground breaking gravity tracks from Hot Wheels first year of production. And, remember, the year before that we were pushing our Matchbox/Dinky/Corgi diecast cars around the floor by hand because there were no Hot Wheels.

Now, in 1969, a massive one hundred lap race is at hand. The orange track is 44 feet long. There are 12 half curves measuring just over 1 foot each. That’s more than 56 total feet (17 meters) of track. One hundred laps means the cars will cover more than a mile (1.6 kilometres) together. From hand pushing diecast cars to mile running in just 2 years. Simply amazing!

On this track today, I am putting a gold 2010 Ford Mustang GT with Faster Than Ever wheels up against a blue 1971 redline Six Shooter.  New school vs old school. 

For more information on this track, check out my earlier review of the Super-Charger Grand Prix Race Set (part 1).

https://hotwheelsracetracks.wordpress.com/2012/03/02/1969-hot-wheels-super-charger-grand-prix-race-set/

super-charger-grand-prix-set-6 (1)

1969 Hot Wheels 2-Way Super-Charger

The 1969 Hot Wheels 2-Way Super-Charger.

Box art - front.

Box art – front.

Box art - side.

Box art – side.

Here are the instructions.

Instructions. Page 1. Copyright Mattel, Inc.

Instructions. Page 1. Copyright Mattel, Inc.

Instructions. Page 2. Copyright Mattel, Inc.

Instructions. Page 2. Copyright Mattel, Inc.

Instructions. Page 3. Copyright Mattel, Inc.

Instructions. Page 3. Copyright Mattel, Inc.

Instructions. Page 4. Copyright Mattel, Inc.

Instructions. Page 4. Copyright Mattel, Inc.

The 2-Way Super-Charger was only sold by itself and in 2 other sets:

The 1969 Grand Prix Race Set

Box art - front. Courtesy eBay.

Box art – front. Courtesy eBay.

And the 1970 Hi-Performance Set

Box art - front. Copyright Mattel, Inc.

Box art – front. Copyright Mattel, Inc.

The standard Super-Charger typically goes with oval tracks.  It’s pretty easy for a Hot Wheels car to run on a track with just 2 full curves.

1969 Collectors' Catalogue. Copyright Mattel, Inc.

1969 Collectors’ Catalogue. Copyright Mattel, Inc.

The 2-Way Super-Charger powers figure-8 layouts.  Figure-8 tracks are a lot harder for Hot Wheels cars to deal with because they have to negotiate 6 half curves on every lap.  Appropriately, Mattel calls this figure-8 layout “The Tricky 8”.

Box art - back.

Box art – back.

Today I am putting 6 Hot Wheels cars through their paces on “The Tricky 8” track.

l to r: Aston Martin Vantage GT3, '07 Shelby GT500, '68 Mercury Cougar, Custom '15 Ford Mustang, Corvette Grand Sport and Olds 442.

l to r: Aston Martin Vantage GT3, ’07 Shelby GT500, ’68 Mercury Cougar, Custom ’15 Ford Mustang, Corvette Grand Sport and Olds 442.

Each car will attempt to run 10 laps non-stop. Here’s what happened:

So there you have it. The 1969 Hot Wheels 2-Way Super-Charger driving the figure-8 layout.

It’s still fast. Still fun.

Box art - end.

Box art – end.

1969 Collectors' Catalogue. Copyright Mattel, Inc.

1969 Collectors’ Catalogue. Copyright Mattel, Inc.

1969 Collectors' Catalogue. Copyright Mattel, Inc.

1969 Collectors’ Catalogue. Copyright Mattel, Inc.

1970 Hot Wheels Hi-Performance Set

The second Tune-Up Tower set for 1970 comes with a two-way Super-Charger.  It is the Hi-Performance Set.

Box art - front. Copyright Mattel, Inc.

Box art – front. Copyright Mattel, Inc.

This set includes 15 1/2 feet of orange track, 3 joiners, 8 half curves, 2 arch bridges, 3 white trestles 2 red trestles, 1 lane merger, 1 Tune-Up Tower with 1 wheel wrench and 1 two-way Super-Charger.

Set contents. Courtesy eBay.

Box art - back. Courtesy eBay.

Box art – back. Courtesy eBay.

Close up of contents list. Courtesy eBay.

Close up of contents list. Courtesy eBay.

Mattel envisioned the Hi-Performance Set layout as a freeway system.  And in keeping with all this track, the set comes with 4 new cars too.

1970 Collectors’ Catalogue. Copyright Mattel, Inc.

1970 Collectors’ Catalogue. Full page of Tune-Up Tower Sets. Copyright Mattel, Inc.

So there you have it.  The 1970 Hot Wheels Hi-Performance Set.

It’s still fast.  Still fun.

As a kid, I always worked my Hot Wheels cars pretty hard.  They ran fast, they ran often and they got lots of wear.

Two of my childhood cars: a red Torero and a blue Twin Mill. They’ve seen lots of track time.

A Tune-Up Tower sure would have come in handy to help my cars maintain the pace I was setting for them. Here’s some pictures of the Tune-Up Tower box by itself.

Box art for Tune-Up Tower – front and side. Courtesy eBay.

Box art for Tune-Up Tower - front. Courtesy eBay.

Box art – front. Courtesy eBay.

Box art - side. Courtesy eBay.

Box art – side. Courtesy eBay.

Box art - back. Courtesy eBay.

Box art – back. Courtesy eBay.

Tune-Up Tower contents stacked in box. Courtesy eBay.

Front page of Tune-Up Tower instructions. Courtesy eBay.

Front page of Tune-Up Tower instructions. Courtesy eBay.

An inside page of the instruction book. Courtesy eBay.

An inside page of the instruction book. Courtesy eBay.

This is a comic book ad for the Tune-Up Tower.

Tune-Up Tower ad. Courtesy eBay.

Tune-Up Tower page in 1970 Hot Wheels Racing World Magazine. Courtesy http://www.toycarcollector.com.

1970 Hot Wheels Super-Charger Speed Test Set

Mattel’s second speed set for 1970 put a Super-Charger behind the thrust to get Hot Wheels cars blazing.  Unlike the other two speed sets, this one let you run a car on an oval and keep upping the power to achieve faster and faster clockings.  Eventually you would record the fastest possible speed for a given car before it reached the limits of it’s stability and crashed.

The 1970 Super-Charger Speed Test Set includes 16 feet of orange track, 8 joiners, 1 Super-Charger, 1 single lane Speedometer, 2 trestles and one bridge.

Here’s the track layout.

And here are my 4 test cars.

L to R: 1968 COPO Camaro, 1986 Monte Carlo SS, Custom V-8 Vega, and 2007 Ford Shelby GT-500.

A lap around the track starts at the Super-Charger.

With no waste of time or speed, the cars blast straight into the Speedometer.

Nearly 120 MPH / 200 KPH and looking for more the next time through.

Up and around the elevated first full curve.

Over the bridge.

Around the second full turn and back into the Super-Charger for another speed shot.

Here’s a link to my YouTube channel showing the speeds these cars recorded as the Super-Charger spun faster and faster.  

There you have it.  The 1970 Hot Wheels Super-Charger Speed Test Set.  “The fastest metal cars in the world” is what it’s all about.

And it’s still fast.  Still fun.

1970 Hot Wheels Collectors’ Catalogue. Copyright Mattel, Inc.

Box art – front. Courtesy eBay.

Box art - back. Courtesy eBay.

Box art – back. Courtesy eBay.

Box art - side. Courtesy eBay.

Box art – side. Courtesy eBay.

Box art - side. Courtesy eBay.

Box art – side. Courtesy eBay.

Box art - other side in red, black and white. Courtesy eBay.

Box art – other side in red, black and white. Courtesy eBay.

A nice example of complete contents. Courtesy eBay.

Speed Test Set with instructions. Courtesy eBay.

The set with instructions. Courtesy eBay.

The set with instructions. Courtesy eBay.

The set with instructions. Courtesy eBay.